Scientists use data from the eROSITA X-ray telescope to map unprecedented images of the universe’s entire sky

A stunning new image of the universe offers unprecedented detail and groundbreaking visuals, showing the Milky Way’s character as a giant black hole growing in distant galaxies,media reported. This is the masterpiece of the eROSITA X-ray telescope of the “Spectroscopic-Lenchen-Gamma” (SRG) mission, jointly carried out by Germany and Russia, and promises to see the deepest sky from its 360-degree instruments.

Scientists use data from the eROSITA X-ray telescope to map unprecedented images of the universe's entire sky

eROSITA was launched nearly a year ago and entered the L2 orbit of Lagrange. It is equipped with seven identical mirror modules that introduce X-ray photons into a custom camera. The result is an incredibly detailed view of the sky, though not necessarily a quick view.

In fact, it was not until June 11 that eROSITA completed its first full survey. Each point in the sky is exposed for an average of 150-200 seconds — the telescope rotates — although some areas have accumulated exposure times of several hours. In total, there are more than 165GB of data, which may not sound like much, but given that telescopes are almost a million miles from Earth, efficient transmission becomes more difficult.

Scientists use data from the eROSITA X-ray telescope to map unprecedented images of the universe's entire sky

The Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, which downloads data every day, has compiled the first complete survey into an incredible color image.

“The red diffuse glow far from the Milky Way’s plane is the launch of hot gas (local bubbles) near the solar system,” the researchers explained. “Along the plane itself, dust and gas absorb the lowest energy of X-ray photons, so you can only see high-energy emission sources, and their colors are blue in the image. “At the same time, at the center, is the hotter gas plume represented by green and yellow. They are the result of some of the most explosive events in the universe, such as supernova explosions and even the remnants of supermassive black holes thought to be at the center of the Milky Way.

“It is hundreds of thousands of X-ray sources that penetrate this rapidly high-temperature diffuse medium, mostofly white in the image and evenly distributed in the sky,” observed researchers at the Max Planck Institute. “Of these, distant active galactic nuclei are visible as point sources, while clusters of galaxies are presented in the form of expanded X-ray nebulae. “

Scientists use data from the eROSITA X-ray telescope to map unprecedented images of the universe's entire sky

In all, about 1 million X-ray sources have been identified in the images. The scientists plan to compare eROSITA’s all-sky data with existing data from other instruments collected at different wavelengths.

“This combination of sky area and depth is transformative,” explains Kirpal Nandra, head of MPE’s high-energy astrophysics team. “We’ve been sampling the cosmological volume of the hot universe on a much larger scale than previously possible. Over the next few years, we will be able to detect further afield to where the first giant cosmic structures and supermassive black holes formed. “

While this work is being carried out on Earth, eROSITA continues to collect data in space. It is expected to complete a second all-sky survey by the end of this year, which will measure the evolution of the universe between the two. It will continue to complete seven maps over the next three and a half years. “Their combined sensitivity will be increased fivefold and will be used by astrophysicists and cosmologists for decades. Rashid Sunyaev, chief scientist of the Russian SRG team, said.