US NIH details five lifestyles that can significantly reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease

The National Institute steamer (NIA), a subsidiary of the National Institutes of Health(NIH), recently funded a study that linked five lifestyle behaviors to a significantly lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in a person. The study, recently published in the journal Neurology, revealed that people who adhered to at least four lifestyle factors had a 60 percent lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

US NIH details five lifestyles that can significantly reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer’s disease, a form of dementia most commonly seen in people over the age of 70, slowly robs people of memory and can cause emotional problems. The increase in cases of Alzheimer’s disease in recent years has led to extensive research into how to detect the disease early before symptoms appear, preventing or reversing its development.

US NIH details five lifestyles that can significantly reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer’s disease is associated with genetic and lifestyle factors, neither of which necessarily leads to the occurrence of the disease. The new study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, focused on lifestyle, finding five lifestyle habits in 3,000 subjects that significantly reduced the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. They are:

– Moderate or vigorous exercise for at least 150 minutes per week.

– No smoking

– Eat mind diet, which is a combination of DASH and the Mediterranean diet, with plant-based foods as the main.

– Stay active in old age

– Limiting alcohol intake

Based on participants’ data, the study found that at least four of the five factors had to be followed to see the benefits, although even one lifestyle factor was found to reduce the risk by 37 percent. The study follows a number of previous studies that have found a similar link between lifestyle factors and Alzheimer’s risk, and some warn that poor sleep quality and high blood pressure may increase a person’s risk of developing the disease.