New coronavirus cases recorded in U.S. multi-day

The number of new crowned confirmed cases in the U.S. increased significantly on Wednesday local time, with some states setting new records,media BGR reported. The total number of new CASES OF COVID-19 on that day appears to have exceeded its previous peak in April. A record 45,557 new cases of new coronavirus were reported in the U.S. on Wednesday, according to NBC News. The previous record was on April 26, when more than 36,000 confirmed cases were registered, according to the same tracking data.

New coronavirus cases recorded in U.S. multi-day

The data do not match other statistics. The previous record was more than 36,400 on April 24, according to Johns Hopkins University.

New coronavirus cases recorded in U.S. multi-day

In addition, the Coronavirus App has been tracking the coronavirus epidemic from the start. According to its data, there were 38,651 new cases of new coronavirus in the United States on June 24, hundreds less than the 38,951 registered on April 10. The differences in data are easy to explain. Different states may report their numbers at different times, and some of these sites may count them on different days.

New coronavirus cases recorded in U.S. multi-day

In addition, previous hot spots have largely flattened the curve, including New York, Connecticut and New Jersey. The sharp rise in new confirmed cases is now in other regions. Texas (6,177), Florida (5,511) and California (5,511) all reported record numbers of new infections on Wednesday, according to Worldmeters. Significant spikes were also observed in Arizona, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina, all registered between 1,284 and 1,795 new confirmed cases on Wednesday. Alabama, Ohio, Tennessee and Louisiana each have more than 900 new confirmed cases on average.

New coronavirus cases recorded in U.S. multi-day

Scott Gottlieb, a former FDA director, said progress in Florida, Texas and Arizona was particularly worrying, warning that the blockade could be in order again.

By the time of writing, there were more than 2.453 million new confirmed cases and more than 125,000 deaths in the United States, according to Johns Hopkins University. The number of newly confirmed cases worldwide has exceeded 9.6 million and the number of deaths exceeds 489,000.