When the dinosaurs died out, the solar system was on the other side of the Milky Way.

There doesn’t seem to be much to do with space and dinosaurs, except for the asteroid that wiped out dinosaurs 65 million years ago, but an animated video released by NASA scientists links the two. For the past decade, NASA scientists have been using data collected by NASA’s Kepler, Kepler and TESS telescopes to study the frequency and frequency of planets that appear in the Milky Way.

Just as early explorers mapped it, astronomers are now trying to map the spiral structure of the Milky Way.

When the dinosaurs died out, the solar system was on the other side of the Milky Way.

When the dinosaurs died out, the solar system was on the other side of the Milky Way.

This starts with the age of the stars you observe. For example, the stars that make up the pleataeded cluster are about 13 million years old and may sound ancient, but from an astronomical point of view, these stars are still very young. Dinosaurs never had a chance to see the pleatons, because these stars formed tens of millions of years after their extinction, not only that, but the solar system was in the opposite position of the Milky Way when the dinosaurs were extinct.

This is not really news, because few people think about the motion of the solar system in the Milky Way. We don’t think about changes in the sky, but as time goes on, the night sky we see does change.

Eventually, NASA scientists made a set of slides using a classic Milky Way view map by Robert Hurt, a senior scientist at the California Institute of Technology, and then made it into a video via a video, hoping to show that, despite the very different time scales of astronomy than we feel, But it fits well with the time scale of archaeology.

Animation shows that the sun takes about 200 million to 250 million years to rotate around the center of the Milky Way for about 200 million to 250 million years. Judging by where we are in the Milky Way today and the timeline in the animation, we’re almost done. The last time the solar system was located in this area was about the Time of the Triassic period, when dinosaurs first appeared on Earth. The Jurassic that followed lasted 55 million years. Then came the Cretaceous period, which lasted until about 65 million years ago, when the dinosaurs died out.

Dinosaurs such as sword dragons, birds and southern pythons all lived in the early Cretaceous period, when The Earth was on the other side of the Milky Way. The Cretaceous period lasted 79 million years, most of which was spent in the region. And in the period of the tyrannosaur’s life, the earth is closer to where it is today.

After the extinction of dinosaurs 65 million years ago, mammals began to rise, and we are still at this stage. At the end of the animation, a thought-provoking question is raised: What will happen on Earth when the solar system completes its next rotation cycle?

Although animation is simple, the scientific principle of interpretation is quite complex. While astronomers are still studying the details of the star’s rotation around the center of the galaxy, basically everything in the Milky Way is orbiting the central black hole. The closer you get to the center, the faster the star turns, and the closer you get to the periphery, the slower the star turns. The solar system is located on a spiral arm of the Milky Way, and the entire arms, including other stars around us, rotate together around the center of the Milky Way.

In addition, the Milky Way itself is spinning around the larger Andromeda galaxy. The two galaxies are getting closer to each other and will collide in another 4 billion years. It sounds thrilling, but there are so many gaps inside the galaxy that there is no real collision between stars.

So relatively speaking, we’re back to where we were 200 million to 250 million years ago. But because the Milky Way itself is constantly moving and spinning, we will never be able to return to our former absolute position.

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