NASA’s new images of the Sahara Desert reveal the scale of dust cover

According tomedia reports, according to NASA, local time on June 23 and 24, a layer of dust covered Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, while also entering the united States southern Texas. As of June 24, the thickest part of the dust column had expanded from 1,500 miles covered on June 18 to 5,000 miles. While particles like this spread of dust may have potentially negative effects on human breathing, this incident is not entirely a bad thing.

NASA's new images of the Sahara Desert reveal the scale of dust cover

NASA says particles spreading from sandstorms can also help build beaches and fertile land. In addition, the widespread impact of Saharan dust storms may ultimately help reduce or even inhibit the intensity of tropical cyclones.

NASA's new images of the Sahara Desert reveal the scale of dust cover

Colin Seftor, an atmospheric scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and the author of the latest image, explained: “While it is not uncommon for Saharan sand and dust to cross the ocean to the Americas, the scale and intensity of this particular event is quite unusual.” In addition, if you look out from the African coast, you can see another huge cloud drifting from the continent, which in turn sends energy to long chain dust across the Atlantic. “