Researchers show new spray-based touch technology that is compatible with almost any surface.

Combined with 3D printing and sprayable electronics, a team at the University of Bristol has developed a ProtoSpray touch solution for surfaces of objects that are almost any shape. As you can see from demo videos, it can be used on cubes, hemispherical, and even curved bar tubes, demonstrating extreme flexibility. When put into business, it’s clear that interactive innovations of all shapes and sizes can be driven.

Researchers show new spray-based touch technology that is compatible with almost any surface.

Combined with 3D-printed substrates, pre-designed interconnect electrodes, and evenly distributed electroluminescence (EL) ink layers, this solution provides the variety of configurations that users need.

ProtoSpray yn irregularly shaped yn sydd (via)

After the charge is applied, the finished product is partially lit and responds to simple touch inputs, such as opening the office door or providing a tour guide in the museum.

Researchers show new spray-based touch technology that is compatible with almost any surface.

Ollie Hanton, a researcher at the university, says ProtoSpray supports object interaction of any shape, freeing the screen from a two-dimensional rectangular shell.

Researchers show new spray-based touch technology that is compatible with almost any surface.

Next, they might want to build a machine that can produce substrates and spray ink to accelerate the commercialization of ProtoSpray.

Researchers show new spray-based touch technology that is compatible with almost any surface.

The school team has presented their progress at the recent ACM Human Machine Systems Conference (CHI).

Originally titled ProtoSpray: Combining 3D Printing and Spray to Create Interactive Interactive With Arbitrary Shapes.