Israeli research suggests that humans walked out of Africa during the Ice Age

A new Israeli study suggests that humans may have moved out of Africa during the ice age about 200,000 years ago, contrary to conventional wisdom. Previously, researchers have found fossils of human jaws dating back about 200,000 years in a cave in northern Israel called Mislia, one of the earliest human fossils ever found outside Africa.

Israeli research suggests that humans walked out of Africa during the Ice Age

Writing in the new issue of the international academic journal Journal of Human Evolution, Lior Weisbrod and others at the Israel Antiquities Authority analyzed 13 animal fossils in the cave that belong to the same stratosphere as previously discovered human fossils. The results showed that some of these rodents have characteristics such as living in high-cold areas, similar to some that live in high-cold areas such as the Caucasus Mountains today.

Israeli research suggests that humans walked out of Africa during the Ice Age

The researchers therefore believe that in the years of human and animal life, the local was still the cold ice age. This suggests that the natural conditions of the time did not prevent some humans from moving out of Africa, and some migrants from Africa overcame climate barriers and successfully adapted to the new environment.

Traditional theories suggest that the harsh natural conditions of the Ice Age prevented human migration stoe on all continents.

Israeli research suggests that humans walked out of Africa during the Ice Age

Mina Weinstein Efron, a professor at Haifa University who was involved in the study, said the findings could help to analyze the origins of modern humans and the development of human physiology and behavioral abilities, as well as their ability to move them out of Africa during the ice age and help them quickly capture continents.