Harvard’s new crown map shows the spread of COVID-19 in U.S. counties and determines the level of risk.

According tomedia BGR, various new crown virus map projects provide real-time accurate details about the COVID-19 pandemic, the disease has been tracked from an early stage. Researchers from Harvard University are leading a new effort to provide a unified way to map the spread of coronaviruses in the United States and to objectively measure risks all the way to the county level. The tool is already available online, providing users with a way to assess THE RISK OF COVID-19 in specific states and counties.

Harvard's new crown map shows the spread of COVID-19 in U.S. counties and determines the level of risk.

Danielle Allen, a professor at Harvard University, and researchers at the Harvard Institute for Global Health led a collaboration with top scientists at institutions across the United States. The researchers came up with a new way to measure the local spread of COVID-19 and determine the level of risk. The team created a uniform set of metrics and standard definitions of risk that can be applied at the state or county level. The new tools can provide more accurate information on the evolution of local epidemics than most other tools.

The map provides a color-based risk rating based on the number of new cases per 100,000 people per day, from green to yellow, followed by orange and red. “When you go into the orange and red areas, it means that, in all possible cases, you see a lot of speed, a rapid upward trend,” Allen told NPR.

Harvard's new crown map shows the spread of COVID-19 in U.S. counties and determines the level of risk.

Communities with fewer than one new case per day for every 100,000 people are green. 1 to 10 cases mean yellow, and 10 to 25 cases are orange. Anything above 25 would turn the area red.

The tool does not show people the total number of confirmed cases in a county or state. Instead, it allows Americans to assess the risk to a county relative to the rest. “It allows you to compare a rural area of upstate New York with New York City and compare the relative impact with the relative case count,” Ellie Graeden of Georgetown University told NPR. Graeden is a member of the university’s Talus Analytics and Global Center for Health, Science and Security, which is involved in the development of indicators for the new COVID-19 mapping system.

Harvard's new crown map shows the spread of COVID-19 in U.S. counties and determines the level of risk.

The researchers who developed the tool say green means a community is controlling the outbreak. Yellow means that counties should impose more restrictions, such as wearing masks and keeping social distance, as well as more detection and tracking. Orange is “dangerous” and requires a lot of testing and tracking work, combined with home orders.

Red means the outbreak is pretty bad. Once red, “the jurisdiction has reached a tipping point of uncontrolled spread,” Graeden said. You really need to stay at home. “