Scientists show jellyfish-inspired mollusc robot sidonted faster than real-world jellyfish

The jellyfish’s unique way of moving makes it a popular research model for robotic researchers, who hope to develop advanced new machines that make them highly athletic,media New Atlas reported. Scientists have now shown a new type of software robot inspired by these marine life that uses airways to swim at breakneck speeds.

Scientists show jellyfish-inspired mollusc robot sidonted faster than real-world jellyfish

The new software robot, developed by scientists at North Carolina State University and Temple University, is actually based on their earlier work: they previously produced a cheetah-inspired fast-moving robot. The machine alternately pumps air out of the two actuators, causing the stiff spine to bounce from one bend to another in an instant. As study author Yan Jie explains, the latest robots are an improvement on this approach.

“Our previous work focused on making software robots that were inspired by cheetahs — although robots are very fast, they still have a stiff inner spine, ” says Yu. “We wanted to be a completely soft robot, without an inner spine, and still use the concept of switching between two stable states to make the mobile robot move more powerfully — and faster.” One of the animals we inspired is the jellyfish. “

Scientists show jellyfish-inspired mollusc robot sidonted faster than real-world jellyfish

The energy efficiency of jellyfish swimming is unmatched in the marine environment. The team tried to reproduce this by using a polymer disk, which prestressed by stretching in four different directions and then binding to two other non-stress layers, one of which has an air passage. The stacking of polymer discs allows a software robot to switch between a state of relaxation and bending, whereas in a bending state, the bowl-shaped robot quickly reverses into a dome by filling air in an empty channel. This causes the machine to push away the water and move it forward.

“We can ‘bend’ the robot by injecting air into the channel layer, and we control the direction of this bend by controlling the relative thickness of the prestressed layer. “I’m not going to be

In the tests, the soft robots showed an average speed of 53.3 mm per second, and as part of the study, none of the three jellyfish studied exceeded the speed of 30 mm per second.

The study was published in the journal Advanced Materials Technology.