Hubble, ALMA Telescope Tribute to Independence Day: Share The Fireworks Of the Gorgeous Universe

Astronomers are celebrating the July 4 weekend in their own iconic way — releasing a photo of a cosmic firework,media reported. This spectacular image, stitched together with radio and infrared images, shows a group of young stars exploding and forming life. It is reported that the photo is a cluster called G286.21 plus 0.17, located in the Carina region of the Milky Way, about 8,000 light-years from Earth.

Hubble, ALMA Telescope Tribute to Independence Day: Share The Fireworks Of the Gorgeous Universe

There, stars form in dense molecular clouds, while small clusters of dust and gas collapse and burn under intense heat and pressure.

Taking a snapshot of this process requires two telescopes to take different wavelengths of electromagnetic waves. In this scenario, the Atacama Large Millimeter Wave Submillimeter Wave Array (ALMA) captured more than 750 separate radio observations, while the Hubble Space Telescope captured nine infrared images of the same area.

The collaboration between the two instruments brings a wonderful picture. ALMA’s contribution can be expressed in purple, indicating a molecular cloud of new stars, and Hubble captures infrared light, which is represented in red and yellow.

Hubble, ALMA Telescope Tribute to Independence Day: Share The Fireworks Of the Gorgeous Universe

In this image, you can see about 1,000 newly formed stars, including a large cluster of stars spewing out of the nebula from the top right of the image. The energy and radiation they release begin to disperse the clouds. The team notes that the rest of the clouds appear to have enough mass to continue the process for about a million years.

“This shows how dynamic and chaotic the process of star birth is,” said study co-author Jonathan Tan. This process has shaped the area. It’s amazing to think that our own sun and planets were once part of such a cosmic dance. “

The study has been published in the Journal of Astrophysical.