239 experts wrote to WHO saying the new coronavirus could be airborne: vaccine development or a return to the starting point

New research suggests that the new coronavirus can spread in the air like aerosols and has mutated more infectiously than it used to be, but it could mean a return to the starting point of ongoing vaccine development. New information about the new coronavirus suggests it may be harder to stop than previously thought, the report said. First, it is possible for the new coronavirus to spread through the air. Airborne is the transmission through smaller particles of diameter, which may stay in the air for longer periods of time, which may be an important driver of virus transmission.

239 experts wrote to WHO saying the new coronavirus could be airborne: vaccine development or a return to the starting point

In an open letter to the World Health Organization, 239 experts from 32 countries said microparticles smaller than droplets could stay in the air for hours, and even those who remain at a social distance could be infected.

This is contrary to what WHO has long held. Earlier, WHO said the new coronavirus is mainly transmitted from person to person through respiratory droplets. For example, when a patient with new coronary pneumonia coughs or sneezes, droplets can attach to the surface of the object. Therefore, scientists urge WHO to revise its recommendations.

In addition, other studies have found that the virus has mutated, making it more contagious than before. WHO is known to have analysed the genetic sequences of about 60,000 virus samples, 30% of which have mutated but not seriously.

A team of scientists from around the world has also confirmed a new strain of the new coronavirus, called G614, that spread three to nine times faster than the previous D614. However, there have also been studies that say the new version of the virus is less pathogenic, but may ineffective the candidate vaccine because it was developed based on an earlier strain.