Microsoft wearable new patent exposure: more accurate measurement of wearer’s blood pressure

With Microsoft Band discontinuing support in 2016, Microsoft’s exploration on the wearable road has come to an end. But that doesn’t mean Microsoft has abandoned the field and filed a flood of patents on wearable technology in preparation for future re-emergence. Recently, a new patent was announced, addressing a pain point in blood pressure measurement in wearable devices.

Microsoft wearable new patent exposure: more accurate measurement of wearer's blood pressure

Microsoft wearable new patent exposure: more accurate measurement of wearer's blood pressure

The patent, called the Wearable Pulse Wave Send Device, is different from the solution used by Band, more like a patch with a row of pressure sensors lying side-by-side in a specific area (presumably near an artery). The highlight of the patent is that the device looks for and reminds the user where it is placed to be the most accurate reading. Ideally, Microsoft’s arterial monitoring system will reduce false positive readings and inform users with the most accurate readings every day. However, Microsoft did leave enough room for its new patent to be used as a smartwatch if necessary.

The wristband comes in the form of a so-called “smartwatch” and has all the computing, display, and communication functions that come with it. It is reported that, taking into account the user interface function of the smartwatch, wearable sensing embodiments can be configured by conventional means to display information to the wearer. For example, you can display to the user the operating instructions implemented by the wristband and the calculated cardiovascular indicators.

Microsoft’s patent aims to regularly measure pulse pressure along arterial stakes to help patients with high or hypertension and track their blood pressure levels. Although Microsoft Band was first launched in 2014, it wasn’t until the company launched Band 2 in 2015 that it really took the first step in fitness. Microsoft Band 2 includes early industry iterations of optical heart rate monitoring, shock skin reaction sensors, skin temperature sensors, capacitive sensors, and improved sleep tracking software.