Hubble captures fascinating spiral galaxy: with young hot star halo

A hollow galaxy has released a massive spiral cloud — one of the most striking recent images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, according tomedia reports. NgC 2275 is reported to be 67 million light-years from Earth, and its stellar activity is relatively flat compared to other regions in space. But it is this fact that makes it look so fascinating.

Hubble captures fascinating spiral galaxy: with young hot star halo

NGC 2275 is “floc” — that is, it is a fluffy galaxy on the outside. The galaxy is spiralling, with a complex spiral of light, mottled clouds and starlight.

But the center of the galaxy is relatively sparse. NASA and ESA explain edited that this is because NGC 2275 has actually run out of gas that has been found there. The unusually large and relatively empty galactic bump is believed to have been used to store material to generate stars.

As for the plume of the spiral from the center of the center of the central, they are the result of the interaction of gas clouds, violently burning new stars, and NGC 2275 itself. The blue stars are young and hot, and they shine brightly. They are believed to have triggered star formation in nearby gas clouds, a chain reaction on the size of the Milky Way.

Hubble captures fascinating spiral galaxy: with young hot star halo

At the same time, the gas cloud itself is cut during the rotation of NGC 2275. The result is a soft, speckled cloud and stellar halo, distinctfrom the so-called large design spiral, which features a sharper, more contoured spiral arm.

The Hubble telescope has been providing a reliable source of dramatic images since its launch in 1990. Space telescopes use the advantages of the Earth’s atmosphere to capture ultraviolet and visible images to help scientists keep an eye on the universe. However, while NASA and ESA have taken on a number of missions, the truth is that the telescope will eventually be decommissioned. But in the future the James Webb Space Telescope will be deployed to take over from Hubble. Although the new space telescope project has been delayed several times, the current schedule is set for early 2021.