‘Watermelon snow’ in Alps scientists say it could be a dangerous sign

Biagio Di Mauro, a researcher at the Polar Science Institute of the Italian National Research Council, said there was pink snow (also known as “watermelon snow”) on the Presena glacier in northern Italy. While it is not uncommon for the Italian Alps to see these phenomena in spring and summer, scientists become concerned when the phenomenon, caused by algae, begins to occur frequently.

Di Mauro told CNN that the lack of snow and rising temperatures in 2020 have contributed to the proliferation of algae. More algae may cause the ice to melt faster.

When Di Mauro clarified an article in the Guardian on Twitter, he said the algae could be snow algae Chlamydomonas nivalis. He also said the algae’s link to climate change has not been confirmed.

'Watermelon snow' in Alps scientists say it could be a dangerous sign

Di Mauro posted a photo of the pink snow on Twitter on Monday.

'Watermelon snow' in Alps scientists say it could be a dangerous sign

At the end of May, it was reported that green snow from microalgae was reported in Antarctica. Although micro, these can still be discovered by satellite. The researchers say the color may also be linked to the effects of warming.