Scientists have a more accurate understanding of the Dragon, which is very different from the description in Jurassic Park.

Scientists have got a more accurate understanding of Dilophos, which is a far cry from the description in Jurassic Park. These creatures have bone caps on their heads, but they’re not as small as the movies show — the real ones can be as long as 20 feet. In fact, researchers didn’t know much about the species when the film was released, and now, decades on, scientists have been more accurate in their portrayal of the creature.

Scientists have a more accurate understanding of the Dragon, which is very different from the description in Jurassic Park.

In a new paper published in the Journal of Paleontology, researchers reveal their findings after studying the few high-quality twin skeletons found so far. As the paper explains, these dinosaurs, apart from the skulls on their heads, are completely different from those depicted in the film.

“Dilophosaurus wetherilli is the largest known animal to live on North American land in the early Jurassic period,” the researchers wrote. “Despite its charms in popular culture and dinosaur system developmental analysis, the major aspects of the dinosaur’s bone anatomy, taxonomy, ontology and evolutionary relationship seisis are still unknown.”

The researchers say the mini-dinosaurs in Jurassic Park are much smaller than the real ones. The real twin-crowned dragon, which is 20 feet (6 meters) long, is considered the largest land animal of the time, high above, looking down at much smaller prey, and never gives them venom. As for the iconic crowns on the top of the creature’s skull, these are very real, but not exactly what appears in the movie.

On the screen, these bony crowns are thin and narrow. In fact, the double crown keel crown has a good “airbag” reinforcement, providing rigidity. The same “airbags” were also found in the skull, suggesting that the animals had powerful muscles to control their jaws. The team also said the “airbags” could be used to show off to attract mates, just like some modern birds, though we can’t be sure.