Tens of thousands of people will be selected to participate in vaccine clinical trials on the U.S. New Crown Virus Prevention website

A large-scale u.S. research project on new crown vaccines will take place throughout the summer and fall,media reported. On Wednesday, the new coronavirus prevention network (coronavirusnetwork.org) went online, giving Americans the opportunity to sign up for a series of clinical trials of vaccines. More than 1 million Americans are expected to sign up for the COVID-19 vaccine study, and tens of thousands will be selected to participate.

Tens of thousands of people will be selected to participate in vaccine clinical trials on the U.S. New Crown Virus Prevention website

As explained on the website, the trials were conducted by the COVID-19 Prevention Network (CoVPN), “formed by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) under the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to respond to the global pandemic”. If Americans are interested in participating, they can register on the site, but they must first sign a consent form and then complete a survey. The survey covered issues such as place of residence, work, people’s past and present health, and contact information. It is expected that 1.5 million people will register.

More than 100 research sites in the U.S. and around the world will send information to the closest place to place of residence once people register, CNN reported. The goal of phase 3 is to see if the vaccine candidate scans people from infection, so people who work from home or who are rarely around are not particularly valuable tests because their chances of getting infected are already low.

“We need people of black and brown species who are representing communities that are more affected by the outbreak,” said Dr. Carl Fichtenbaum, medical director of the Moderna Trialat at the University of Cincinnati Health Center. “

Moderna is expected to launch one of the first large-scale coronavirus vaccine trials this week, but the date has been postponed until late July or early August. Dr. Richard Novak, lead researcher on clinical trials at the University of Illinois at Chicago, said that once the trial does begin, volunteers will receive two injections, one month apart. Half will take two doses of the vaccine and the other half will take a placebo. The study will last for two years, with volunteers keeping weekly diaries, talking to staff regularly, and testing a total of seven times. In order to get the results that biotech companies expect, they will need tens of thousands of people to participate.