Intel 10nm process processors are impressive: not unstable on the frequency after hibernation

Intel’s two years in the advanced process is a bit of a mess, 10nm process delay edifold enough to achieve a high enough performance level, the most immediate consequence is the frequency does not go. 14nm already can be done on the desktop and game book ten core 5.3GHz, eight core 5.3GHz, 10nm can only stay on the thin book, the four cores up to 3.9GHz or 4.1GHz, the latter is also specially customized by Apple.

Intel has released a third-generation scalable to-strengthen processor, code-named Cooper Lake, but it’s still 14nm and is limited to the four- and eight-way markets, and Ice Lake-SP for the broader dual-way market will be on the 10nm process for the first time, with its core and frequency specifications remaining a mystery, but the signs are not encouraging.

Intel 10nm process processors are impressive: not unstable on the frequency after hibernation

Intel Linux engineers recently submitted a new patch, related to power management on the Ice Lake-SP platform, further exposing ineffectual force at 10nm process frequencies.

“On icX platforms, CPU frequency increases are slow when recovering from C1E or lower hibernation,” Intel engineers said in the patch description. While this does save power in many cases, it can also lead to unexpected situations, such as the application load may not produce enough performance due to uncertainty about CPU frequency. “

Intel’s solution to this problem is also “violent”, not at the hardware level, but directly prohibit the C1E, C6 state of automatic start-up, to maintain a sustained high frequency, high performance, at the cost of not saving electricity.

It is unclear whether the problem also exists in Windows systems.