Google plans to disable the over-distorted beauty filter by default on Android 11.

With the rise of smartphones and the mobile Internet, cameras are also experiencing rapid development of beauty filters. Initially, these filters were designed to adjust the color balance for unique ideas, or to make sure everyone in the photo was open-eyed by stitching them together. However, the rapid advance of AI’s beauty technology has also been heavily criticized on social networks. The trend, set off by “cheating” enthusiasts, has been accused of conveying unhealthy values (such as distorted body distortions and white skin tones). Even children and adults involved in the world blindly pursue “sick beauty”, resulting in eating disorders.

Google plans to disable the over-distorted beauty filter by default on Android 11.

In a leaked Document on Android 11 Compatibility Definitions, XDA-Developers editor-in-chief Mishal Rahman found that Google appears to have a plan to say no to this harmful trendfeature.

Instead of completely disabling all beauty features offered by OEMs by default, however, this policy wants the camera app to disable filters that can cause “distortion” by default.

Google plans to disable the over-distorted beauty filter by default on Android 11.

The original text reads as follows:

For any android.hardware.camera2.CameraDevice camera device or Android hardware, it is important to ensure that the Camera API does not change the face appearance of the subject, including but not limited to changing the geometry of the face, skin tone, and smoothness of the skin.

OEMs and end users may be unhappy, given that most consumers are unlikely to make any changes to the camera’s default settings, and even Apple is starting to add facial decoration to its photo apps.

After upgrading Android 11, for example, mobile phone users may feel that the image quality of their device is “declining”, but this is closer to the real effect.