The DHS is concerned that masks could help lawbreakers evade facial recognition technology enforcement.

According tomedia reports, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) internal concerns, designed to prevent the spread of the new crown virus masks may interfere with facial recognition technology. In addition, the agency seems concerned that even after the new crown pandemic, criminals will still use masks to evade law enforcement. The potential impact of the widespread use of protective masks on the security operations that integrate facial recognition systems was discussed in a joint announcement drafted with other federal agencies, including Immigration and Customs Enforcement, on May 22.

The DHS is concerned that masks could help lawbreakers evade facial recognition technology enforcement.

Infographic.

The agency said in the memo that protesters will use masks to avoid facial recognition procedures, but at the same time DHS acknowledged that there is no definitive information that violent extremists or other criminals in the United States used masks to carry out attacks.

New guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people wear masks in public. Masks help prevent people with new coronary pneumonia from spreading the virus to others, the CDC said.

At the same time, U.S. cities and states have begun restricting the use of facial recognition technology by law enforcement and other entities. Last month, Boston banned the technology from the city, after Oakland and San Francisco also announced a ban on the technology. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in Michigan filed an administrative lawsuit against the Detroit Police Department for wrongfully arresting a man with a wrong facial recognition in January.

Late last month, Democrats introduced a bill in the House of Representatives that would ban facial recognition technology unless explicitly permitted by law.