Microsoft has warned that large-scale Emotet is making a comeback, this time targeting bank ingress.

According tomedia reports, Microsoft recently warned that a massive malware campaign is targeting end-user bank data. Microsoft points out that as part of a new campaign to use The Emoter malware, a large number of emails with hundreds of unique attachments were sent to users. It is understood that the Emotet bank Trojan was first discovered by security researchers in 2014.

Microsoft has warned that large-scale Emotet is making a comeback, this time targeting bank ingress.

Emotet was originally designed as a bank malware that attempts to infiltrate a user’s computer and steal sensitive and private information. The latest version of the software also adds spam and malware delivery services, including other bank Trojans.

Microsoft noted in its report that the network’s phishing activities have been silent for months, but have recently made a comeback. The new campaign uses a long-term Emotet strategy: files with linked e-mail messages or highly confusing malicious macros run a PowerShell script to download payloads through five download links. Download URLs usually point to the website being attacked, which is what Emotet is all about.

The features emoted use help software evade detection from some antimalware products. Emotet uses worm-like features to help it spread to other connected computers, which helps spread malware. The feature led the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to conclude that Emotet is one of the most expensive and destructive malware, affecting governments, the private sector, individuals and organizations, costing more than $1 million per cleanup.