Japanese team measures sugar from meteorites: Humans may have come to Earth this way

The scientific community has always had many explanations for the mystery of human origin. Recently, a team of researchers from Tohoku University and others in Japan detected the sugar in meteorites for the first time, a discovery that also offers a new possibility for exploring human origins. According to the Japan Delivery Association (NHK) and other media reported on the 19th, the research team is composed of Japan and the United States, including Tohoku University, Hokkaido University, Japan Marine Research and Development Agency, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and so on.

Japanese team measures sugar from meteorites: Humans may have come to Earth this way

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The team developed an analytical technique that could detect trace amounts of sugar, measuring the composition of three meteorites, including the Murchison Meteorite, which fell in Australia, and found for the first time the sugar molecules necessary for life in meteorites.

The team found rna (ribonucleic acid) components in two meteorites, such as rna and sugars such as xylitose, the report said. Analysis of carbon isotopes with slightly different masses shows that the isotope ratio is different from that of Earth’s organisms and sugars in the soil, which proves that these sugars are substances formed in space.

Japanese team measures sugar from meteorites: Humans may have come to Earth this way

The results also offer the possibility that in ancient times, due to meteorites and asteroids hitting the Earth, sugar and other substances were brought from space, making it an opportunity for life to be born, said Yukio Kukawa, an associate professor at Tohoku University in Japan.

It is reported that the results will be published in the 19th Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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