Scientists have developed vitamin-fortified microcapsules for shellfish to help solve the problem of vitamin deficiency in humans.

While taking nutrients in tablets is an ideal way, if nutrients are part of the food we eat, they are best absorbed by our bodies,media New Atlas reported. With this in mind, scientists have recently created a supplement for shellfish that radically improves their nutritional content.

Scientists have developed vitamin-fortified microcapsules for shellfish to help solve the problem of vitamin deficiency in humans.

Bivalve shellfish such as oysters, clams and mussels are rich in nutrients and are rich in minerals and trace elements. To better help people ingest nutrients from these shellfish, researchers at the University of Cambridge, led by Dr. David Aldridge and DoctorAl PhD student David Willer, have developed vitamin-enhanced microcapsules that are fed to shellfish before consumers buy them.

It is reported that the size and shape of these capsules can optimize their attractiveness to organisms. Their purpose is to feed shellfish culture for eight hours, nearing the end of their “purification” period, during which they are harvested from the aquaculture bar and held in a cleaning tank.

In laboratory tests, it was found that the oysters fed capsules provided 100 times more vitamin A than regular oysters, and that vitamin D was 150 times higher than that of regular oysters.

Scientists have developed vitamin-fortified microcapsules for shellfish to help solve the problem of vitamin deficiency in humans.

In fact, scientists believe that eating just two oysters a day provides enough vitamins A and D to meet the widely recommended dietary allows. In addition, buying capsule-enhanced shellfish should be much cheaper than buying multivitamin tablets for human consumption – it is estimated that the fortified process should cost about $0.056 more than raising an oyster.

“We’ve shown a cheap and effective way to turn micronutrients into a sustainable and delicious source of protein,” Willer said. “Targeted use of this technology in areas most affected by nutrient deficiencies, using carefully selected bivalve species and micronutrients, can help improve the health of millions of people while also reducing the environmental harm of meat production.”

Currently, BioBullets, A derivative of Dr. Aldridge, is commercializing the technology. The paper on the study was recently published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition.