Challenging the mainstream view: Aging hearing loss is caused by damage to auditory hair cells, not vascular lines.

Presbycusis is generally thought to be caused by the slow degeneration of vascular lines (SV, an important part of the cochlear implant). Previous animal studies have also shown that blood vessels shrink with age and can lead to hearing loss, a process that many scientists generally believe also applies to age-related hearing loss in humans. But the latest research challenges the mainstream view that has dominated medical science for more than half a century.

Challenging the mainstream view: Aging hearing loss is caused by damage to auditory hair cells, not vascular lines.

Photo from wallpaperflare.

Challenging the mainstream view: Aging hearing loss is caused by damage to auditory hair cells, not vascular lines.

Photo from Researchgate.

A team of scientists from the Massachusetts Department of Ophthalmology recently published a landmark study that proposes a new hypothesis to explain age-related hearing loss. New studies provide evidence that age-related hearing loss is mainly caused by cumulative damage to the auditory hair cells of the inner ear, and that hair regeneration techniques may provide new treatments.

The team conducted in-depth studies of the human ear to understand the pathology of age-related hearing loss. The team recorded human ear standards for more than 120 bodies, most of which were accompanied by auditory map data collected during the subject’s lifetime, allowing researchers to clearly link anatomical data to patterns of hearing loss.

The results showed no correlation between vascular damage and the severity of hearing loss. Conversely, the most accurate hearing loss is a direct association with auditory hair cells. This means that damage to auditory hair cells in the cochlea is the main cause of cochlear precosytic lesions, suggesting that age-related hearing loss is not an inevitable consequence of aging, but more related to lifetime acoustic overexposure.

M. Charles Lieberman, co-author of the study, explained: “The higher number of hair cells in the human ear kill, suggesting that high-frequency hearing loss, defined as preeclamptotic disease, may be preventable and mainly reflects the cumulative damage of environmental noise exposure.” We can all hear old age better if we protect our ears more carefully during long-term noisy activities, or avoid them altogether. “