Ubisoft executives have been accused of long-standing crackdowns on women leading the Assassin’s Creed series.

Earlier today, Jason Schreier, a former Well-known Kotaku journalist who now works for Bloomberg, lashed out at Ubisoft executives in a series of tweets, accusing them of apparently being aware of complaints about sexual harassment, abuse, and discrimination, but ignoring them. Take Assassin’s Creed, for example, which has long been a way to suppress the idea of female dominance.

Ubisoft executives have been accused of long-standing crackdowns on women leading the Assassin's Creed series.

As early as 2015’s Assassin’s Creed: Syndicate, the developers of Ubisoft’s Quebec studio scored a show of hope for the roles of Jacob, Frye and Evie.

Although Evie is the first female character in the series to be introduced that can be manipulated by a player, it is still overwhelmingly dominated by Jacob in the final release.

The first draft story for 2017’s Assassin’s Creed: Origins was with Bayek’s injury, and Aya took over as the main character. However, at the time of the actual release, Aya was again demoted to a secondary role.

As for 2018’s Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey, it was originally only Kassandra, a player-only character, and thankfully the player could still choose between him and Alexios.

Ubisoft executives have been accused of long-standing crackdowns on women leading the Assassin's Creed series.

Now Marie Jasmin, a former Ubisoft Montreal UI/UX designer who has worked in Bethesda, confirmed all of these rumors in a series of tweets today.

Interestingly, this year’s upcoming Assassin’s Creed: The Temple of the Spirit will provide gamers with the ability to switch between role genders at any time. Instead of having to make a fixed choice at the beginning of the game, as in the previous play (Odyssey).

It is reported that Assassin’s Creed: The Temple of the Spirit will be available on the PC, Sony PS4, Microsoft Xbox One, and Google’s Stadia platform from November 17.