The SpaceX Dragon crew module has passed the liveability test before returning from the International Space Station.

Earlier this year, spacex, a private space company, successfully delivered the Dragon capsule and two NASA astronauts to the International Space Station with the help of a Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket. As part of NASA’s Dragon DM-2 mission, it is also the final step in the agency’s testing and evaluation of commercialmanned spacecraft. If all goes well, the International Space Station will also use the Commercial Crew Program to transport astronauts.

The SpaceX Dragon crew module has passed the liveability test before returning from the International Space Station.

Astronauts have been busy evaluating the spacecraft’s performance parameters since the Dragon 2 docked with the International Space Station in May.

The first NASA astronauts to board the Dragon capsule were Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley, who have joined Expedition 63 Expedition Commander Chris Cassidy, as well as Anatoly Ivanish Ivanin and Ivan Vagner of NASA.

The SpaceX Dragon crew module has passed the liveability test before returning from the International Space Station.

Astronauts on the International Space Station are planning multiple sky walks to replace aging batteries. At the same time, Behnken, Hurley, Cassidy and Ivanishin also assessed the liveability of the Dragon occupant cabin.

These cover the power generation capacity of the Dragon II spacecraft, the performance of software and life support systems, and NASA’s recently revealed liveability. The good news is that NASA has now confirmed that the Dragon 2 spacecraft has met all of the agency’s requirements.

The SpaceX Dragon crew module has passed the liveability test before returning from the International Space Station.

It is reported that the liveability test includes hatch assessment, waste management, as well as cargo storage and so on. In the future, NASA will also use commercial launch partners as contractors (not service providers) to send more astronauts to the International Space Station.

Last week, NASA Director Jim Bridenstine revealed on social media that the Dragon II spacecraft, which docked with the International Space Station after completing other tests, would return to Earth on August 2.