Scientists have successfully modeled strange metals: discovering new states of matter have something in common with black holes.

The name “Strange Metals” is not only that these materials exhibit different conductivity from traditional metals, but also that they have something in common with black holes. A new study has found that these strange metals can have a new state of matter.

Scientists have successfully modeled strange metals: discovering new states of matter have something in common with black holes.

Unlike conventional metals, strange metals have a direct correlation between resistance and temperature. What humans have observed so far is that electrons in strange metals lose energy at the speed allowed by the laws of quantum mechanics. But this is not the whole picture of the substance, and their conductivity is also related to two basic constants of physics — the Planck constant , which defines how much energy a photon can carry, and the Boltzmann constant , which links the kinetic energy of the particles in the gas to the temperature of the gas.

Scientists have successfully modeled strange metals: discovering new states of matter have something in common with black holes.

Although these properties have long been observed, it is difficult for scientists to accurately model strange metals. So the team from the Flatiron Institute and Cornell University decided to solve the modeling problem.

Scientists have successfully modeled strange metals: discovering new states of matter have something in common with black holes.

Scientists have successfully modeled strange metals: discovering new states of matter have something in common with black holes.

During the modeling process, the team found that strange metals actually represented a new state of matter. It turned out that they existed between two known phases of matter — Mott insulated spin glass and Fermi liquid– and the researchers were able to describe their properties in more detail.

“This quantum spin liquid state is not so locked, but it is not completely free,” said Eun-Ah Kim, the study’s author. It is a dull, soup-like, mud-like state. It is metallic, but it is reluctant metallicity, which pushes the degree of chaos to the limit of quantum mechanics. “

But perhaps the strangest and most striking thing about strange metals is that they have some common characteristics with black holes. The properties of these cosmic wonders are also entirely related to temperature and planck and Boltzmann constants, including the time when they merge with other black holes and “ring”.

Often, the physics of electrons in exotic metals is too complex to be accurately calculated. There are a lot of particles involved, and because electrons tend to form quantum entanglements, they cannot be treated as separate objects.

The team used two different methods to overcome these obstacles. First, they used quantum embedding, which performed complex calculations on only a few atoms, and then generalized the rest of the system. Second, they used a quantum Monte Carlo algorithm that performed calculations using repeated random sampling. Together, this combination helped the team better understand the strange metals.

The team says their new model of strange metals could help physicists understand how superconductors work at higher temperatures.

The study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Source: Simmons Foundation.