YouTube will remove the Community Contribution subtitle feature because it is rarely used.

Google has announced that it will remove YouTube’s “Community Contribution” feature soon because it will hardly be used on videos, and when these subtitles appear, they tend to be of low quality or have other problems,media reported. However, these captions don’t disappear immediately, and YouTube gives users time to switch videos to other captionoptions.

YouTube will remove the Community Contribution subtitle feature because it is rarely used.

YouTube’s community contribution feature is simple: communities can create them instead if creators fail to provide subtitles or titles for their videos. In order for these subtitles to appear on a video, they must be approved by the video creator, or they must get a minimum number of reviews from the wider YouTube community.

Unfortunately, this feature is not so useful. Few users even realize that they can contribute subtitles to the video, and those who are aware of it are likely to abuse the system and generate spam. According to YouTube, even when subtitles are created in good faith, they tend to be of low quality. Last month, a total of 0.0001-% of YouTube channels used community subtitles.

YouTube will remove the Community Contribution subtitle feature because it is rarely used.

As a result of these realities, YouTube said it would remove the Community Contribution feature from all channels on September 28, 2020. If users want to keep subtitles on videos, they need to manually create subtitles using the tools provided by YouTube, or use the platform to automatically generate subtitles, which are usually of high quality but not perfect.

For channels that rarely use community-contributed subtitles, YouTube says it will pay a six-month Amara.org subscription fee, assuming users have used the feature at least three times in the past 60 days. Amara is a service that can be used to add video subtitles and subtitles, as well as to translate videos into different languages.