Google describes Android’s plan to support mainline Linux kernels

At the annual Kernel Developer Summit Linux Plumbers Conference, Google developers explain edged out how Android supports plans for the mainline Linux kernel. Android phones typically use older versions, far from the mainline kernel. For example, Google’s flagship phone, the Pixel 4, is using the Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS, which was released in November 2017.

For the foreseeable future, the model will remain at 4.14. The kernel used by Android devices goes through the fork three times:

The first is Google’s choice of an LTS version to turn it into an Android Common kernel – i.e. a patch unique to Android OS, and Android Common is then offered to SoC vendors such as Qualcomm for a second fork, high The pass hardware patch becomes the SoC kernel, which is then provided to the device manufacturer for a third time, and the kernel patch that supports different components of the device becomes the device kernel, which is finally provided to the customer with the phone.

Android devices use kernel lag kernel mainline for at least two to three years, and Google says it is working to bring the version used by Android closer to the upstream kernel mainline by modular: the Android kernel will be used by Generic Kernel (GKI) and multiple GKI modules are composed of hardware drivers or other patches required to load in a modular manner.                     

Google describes Android's plan to support mainline Linux kernels

Google describes Android's plan to support mainline Linux kernels

Google describes Android's plan to support mainline Linux kernels

Google describes Android's plan to support mainline Linux kernels

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