Intel 11 Generation Core H Series q1 release next year: Game book finally uses 10nm.

Intel’s processor product line is a bit messy right now, with three distinct product lines on desktops and laptops in parallel and time staggered. In 10 generations of Core, the desktop is the Comet Lake-S of the 14nm process, the mobile game is the Comet Lake-H of the 14nm process, and the light sheet is the 14nm Comet Lake-U, 10nm Ice Lake-U.

By the next 11th generation of Core, the rocket Lake on the desktop or 14nm, the thin book debut 10nm Tiger Lake, whether there will be 14nm version is unknown, so how to go next?

This is Tiger Lake-H, and yes, it’s finally going to be 10nm.

According to the latest revelations, Tiger Lake-H will be officially released in the first quarter of next year, with a maximum of eight cores known in specifications, consistent with the current one, and of course a new GPU core display of the Xe architecture, while memory only supports DDR4, while Tiger Lake-U supports LPDDR5 for thin versions.

Note, however, that tiger Lake-H’s thermal design power consumption is 35W, down from 45W, which has been fixed for so many years.

As to why, it is said that Tiger Lake-H is actually Tiger Lake-U hard pull up, but because the 10nm process still can not be high enough performance, thermal design power consumption can only be increased from 15W/28W to 35W, and then up the frequency, power relationship will be out of control.

Intel 11 Generation Core H Series q1 release next year: Game book finally uses 10nm.

So, may the 10nm Tiger Lake-H still need another 14nm H series as an auxiliary? Like 14nm Rocket Lake-H? After all, the game needs is a high-performance CPU, otherwise empty with a new 10nm process but the frequency does not go, it does not make sense.

As things stand, it will only be by 2021 that Intel will fully move to 10nm, and all product lines will no longer use 14nm, but unfortunately the 7nm behind it has been postponed…

Intel 11 Generation Core H Series q1 release next year: Game book finally uses 10nm.