Scientists have discovered that a beetle can escape unscathed from the anus after being eaten by frogs.

According tomedia reports, we all eat something that seems to run through our bodies, but once our food leaves our bodies, it is rare to live another day. But that’s exactly what frogs eat with the aquatic beetle Regimbartia attenuata. Shinji Sugiura, an ecologist at Kobe University, revealed more about the evolution of the animal’s escape behavior in a new study published Monday in The Journal of Current Biology.

Scientists have discovered that a beetle can escape unscathed from the anus after being eaten by frogs.

When the black-spotted side-pleated frog (Pelophylax nigromaculatus) swallows the beetle, it can swim through the frog’s digestive tract and survive and eventually emerge completely from its body.

Previously, it was suspected that frogs would spit out abnormally moving beetles.

Sugiura revealed that during the study, 93 percent of the beetles fed to frogs escaped from the frog’s anus within four hours, “often entangled with fecal particles.” “The beetle’s fastest escape time was an impressive 6 minutes.

Because the aquatic beetle has evolved into a better swimmer by kicking its legs and can breathe underwater by capturing a small bag of air under a wing cover, the beetle may have evolved to survive long enough in the frog’s intestines.

Of course, one wonders how the beetle lets frogs excrete in time.

“Further experiments are needed to study how to stimulate frog defecation,” Sugiura told Wired. Attenuata uses legs and body to stimulate the frog’s back intestines. “

While it may seem like a terrible ordeal for food to climb out of the frog’s buttocks, it’s nothing compared to the larvae of the Epomis beetle genus. When a frog eats the Epomis larvae, it releases enzymes that melt the frog’s meat from the inside out.

In 2016, entomologist Jill Wizen told Wired: “After a few hours, the amphibian was left with a pile of bones and a little skin. “