Astronomers discover the most powerful gamma-ray storm ever recorded, which originated from a collision between two galaxies.

Gamma-ray storms (GRBs) are one of the most active events in the universe, and now astronomers have detected the most powerful gamma-ray stormever ever recorded,media New Atlas reported. The event is almost a thousand times more powerful than the average GRB. Such strong signals can only come from some of the most active events in the universe. When a star enters a supernova and collapses into a neutron star or black hole, emitted a large amount of plasma at near-light speed, grB is produced. It releases more energy in seconds than the sun releases throughout its life cycle.

Astronomers discover the most powerful gamma-ray storm ever recorded, which originated from a collision between two galaxies.

The energy of these pulses is expressed in electron volts (eV), representing the kinetic energy that an electron obtains after accelerating through a potential difference of 1 volt. For most GRBs, the “afterglow” is measured in dozens of GeV. But the latest test results far exceed these – it records up to 1TeV of energy.

Masahiro Teshima, author of the study, said: “We theoretically predicted high-energy GRBs with energy in the TeV range. Astronomers have been searching for such powerful gamma-ray storms for the past 15 years. My international team and I are proud to announce the discovery of the first gamma-ray storm with an energy of up to 1TeV, the highest energy photon ever detected from the GRB. “

The incident, known as GRB190114C, was observed on 14 January this year. It was first discovered by two satellites designed to detect gamma-ray storms, the Neil Gales Swift Observatory and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

Astronomers discover the most powerful gamma-ray storm ever recorded, which originated from a collision between two galaxies.

But astronomers are particularly interested in the “afterglow”, which emits brighter light. To do this, whenever the instruments detect grB, they immediately signal other facilities for follow-up observation. More than 20 telescopes and observatories around the world were subsequently used to observe the event.

The “afterglow” begins about one minute after the initial outbreak and lasts a total of about 20 minutes. In the first 30 seconds or so, the glow is more than 100 times stronger than the Crab Nebula, the brightest known gamma ray source in the Milky Way. Its energy peaked at 1 TeV, but hovered for a while and kept down to 0.3 TeV, but it was still strong.

One of the Hubble telescopes was used to observe the telescope on GRB 190114C. Although it cannot detect gamma rays, the space telescope can help determine how far the event is and what conditions might make it extremely energetic. Gamma-ray bursts have been shown to be the result of collisions between two galaxies.

Andrew Levan, lead author of the study, said: “Hubble’s observations suggest that this particular eruption is located in a very dense environment, in the middle of a bright galaxy 5 billion light-years away. This is indeed unusual, suggesting that the location of this concentration may be the reason it produces this unusually powerful light. “

The study was published in the journal Nature.

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