Microsoft removes the unofficial Chromium browser that developers package themselves from the store.

On Friday, an independent developer surprised Windows users by releasing the open source Chromium browser on the Microsoft Store. The browser is informally ported to the Windows Store by a publisher called Store Ports. The open source Chromium is based on the Blink rendering engine, which is also at the heart of Google Chrome and Microsoft Edge.

There are many reasons why Google or the open source community can’t bring Chromium to the Windows Store, but the main reason sthough it may be related to Microsoft’s app store restrictions. According to Microsoft Store policy, browsers in the store must use Microsoft’s HTML and JavaScript engines.

Microsoft removes the unofficial Chromium browser that developers package themselves from the store.Microsoft removes the unofficial Chromium browser that developers package themselves from the store.Microsoft removes the unofficial Chromium browser that developers package themselves from the store.Microsoft removes the unofficial Chromium browser that developers package themselves from the store.

Surprisingly, an independent developer successfully converted the browser using the desktop bridge and released the open source Chromium browser to the Microsoft Store. But the app’s launch time was so short that Microsoft dropped it a few hours after being told by users.

In a statement, Microsoft removed the unofficial transplant for violating its store policy. “This submission is currently inconsistent with our Windows Store policy and is being corrected and will be removed,” a Microsoft spokesman said.

In theory, Google and Mozilla could also convert the desktop version of Chrome into an app bag and submit the browser to the store. However, the submission will be rejected by Microsoft on the grounds that it violates store policy.

In 2017, Google released a Chrome installer in the Microsoft Store to offer its browser through the Windows 10 App Store. The installer also failed to comply with the Microsoft Store’s browser requirements, which were later removed from the Windows market.

Providing a third-party browser on the Windows Store may be convenient for those who use Windows 10 in S mode, but the current store policy does not allow browsers based on third-party rendering engines, and the policy is unlikely to change any time soon.