The disappearance of the two Arctic ice sheets due to global warming may have a huge impact on the environment.

The ice sheet is a vast land area covered with extremely thick ice, and the formation, extinction, melting water and the change of its distribution and composition directly affect the geological and natural environment changes in local areas and the whole world. Two once-huge Arctic ice sheets have completely disappeared on the chilly Canadian island of Elsmere, according to new images released by NASA. Scientists believe that their complete disappearance could have a huge impact on the environment.

The two ice sheets have existed for centuries, but have disappeared in just 40 years. Scientists had predicted in 2017 that the two ice sheets could die out within five years.

The disappearance of the two Arctic ice sheets due to global warming may have a huge impact on the environment.

Satellite images of two ice sheets taken in 2017.

According to previous reports, the St. Patrick’s Bay ice sheet covered nearly 7.5 square kilometers and 3 square kilometers, respectively, when the first research team arrived on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic in 1959.

In 2017, researchers compared satellite data from July 2015 with vertical aerial photographs taken in August 1959 and found that the area of the two ice sheets had been reduced to 5 percent.

In NASA’s July 14, 2020 image of the on-board thermal emission and reflector (ASTER), the two ice sheets have completely disappeared.

It is reported that the ice sheet of St. Patrick’s Bay is part of the Hassen Plateau and dates back to the times of the Xiaobing River.