The pocket camera inspired the iPod with a camera and nearly became Google’s first hardware.

Now take a mobile phone to shoot video is simply too normal, resolution is enough, there is anti-shake, but also high frame rate of slow-motion video, if paired with a cloud table, is a set of the most basic Vlog equipment. But for quite some time, the title of “pocket camera” was not a mobile phone, but a brand called Pure Digital, which launched the Flip Video camera to create a trend of pocket cameras, with Kodak and Sony following suit, which at one point accounted for 20% of the market.

Jobs also added cameras to the iPod nano 5 in the face of the trend. According to some of the emails revealed at a recent U.S. antitrust hearing, Google also discussed making Flip Video a Google-branded camera that year, nearly becoming Google’s first hardware. Flip Video’s actual fate was acquired by Cisco, and it was a matter of shame to announce a shutdown a few years later.

The pocket camera inspired the iPod with a camera and nearly became Google's first hardware. 

Photo credit: Flickr@Flip Video.

Although Flip Video no longer exists today, its philosophy has deeply influenced later sports cameras, cell phone cameras, look back at Osmo Pocket, Google Clips, and have flip Video shadows on them.

It’s more portable than a camera and better than a cell phone.

Pure Digital’s cameras are positioned to be portable, easy to operate, and cheap, and were sold early in partnership with retail stores for $20-30, with customers returning the device to the store after they ran out and then getting DVDs stored in digital format. The idea is quite good, but when it is actually sold, it is found that some customers will crack the machine, get the digital format of the file directly, or simply view it directly on the small screen, the camera is left behind, this model obviously can not last.

Pure Digital digital officially changed to the name Flip Video in May 2007, with a 1.4-inch screen on the front, with recording keys, power keys, delete keys, playback keys, and microphones and speakers. There’s a foldable USB plug on the side that plugs data directly into your computer, and that’s where The Flip Video’s name comes from.

The pocket camera inspired the iPod with a camera and nearly became Google's first hardware.

Shoot, edit, upload all-in-one.

In September 2007, Pure Digital released the improved Flip Ultra, which is smaller and smaller than the previous Flip Video, with a 2.0-inch screen size and can shoot 720P up to 2 hours of video. Powered by two batteries, the camera is automatically charged when plugged into the computer, greatly reducing battery anxiety.

The pocket camera inspired the iPod with a camera and nearly became Google's first hardware.

It adds an HDMI output on the side, allows you to connect your TV directly to watch videos, photos, and manage files on your computer using the companion FlipShare software.

The pocket camera inspired the iPod with a camera and nearly became Google's first hardware. 

Photo credit: Flickr@Jason Hawkins.

The product became Amazon’s best-selling pocket camera at the time, priced at $149.99. Its bottom can be external tripod, someone with the octopus stabilizer fixed to the bike to shoot, much like later sports cameras, play is very rich, many people used to shoot travel, concert scene pictures.

The pocket camera inspired the iPod with a camera and nearly became Google's first hardware. 

Photo credit: Flickr@paradigmic.

Later, the Flip Video collection introduced custom back-shell play to cater to young fashion.

The pocket camera inspired the iPod with a camera and nearly became Google's first hardware.

Inspired the iPod nano 5 and nearly became a Google camera.

In fact, Google was considering working with Pure Digital back in 2006, and Flip Video nearly became Google’s first hardware. It was Google Video, the predecessor of YouTube (then a competitive relationship), and another big project in-house conversation was the acquisition of YouTube.

The pocket camera inspired the iPod with a camera and nearly became Google's first hardware.

When Pure Digital re-released Flip Video in May 2007, YouTube was one of the key partners, allowing users to connect to a computer via a USB plug, simply edit videos with built-in software and upload them to youTube.

The pocket camera inspired the iPod with a camera and nearly became Google's first hardware. 

Photo credit: Flickr@Caroline et Louis VOLANT.

Launched in 2008 with a compact version of Flip Video Mino, the keystrokes were changed to capacitive, and Pure Digital, as a sponsor, offered Flip Video Mino free of charge to Viewers of YouTube Live, and a website was created to facilitate the uploading of performance videos. This partnership is a win-win for Google and Pure Digital, and the bar for video shooting and sharing is much lower.

The popularity of pocket cameras has also impressed traditional camera makers, with Kodak and Sony launching similar products, and even Jobs’s special mention of Flip Video and YouTube at the iPod nano 5 launch, which introduced cameras to them, is also in line with the portable, inexpensive positioning of the iPod family.

The pocket camera inspired the iPod with a camera and nearly became Google's first hardware.

Flip Video is dead, and the idea of a pocket camera is alive and well.

Pure Digital was definitely one of the hottest hardware vendors of those years, having wanted to go public for a while, and then Cisco bought it in 2009 for $590 million, and while it’s not so strong under the pressure of camera phones, it’s always got a place. Unfortunately, in 2011, Cisco announced its retirement from the consumer business and the Flip Video series was canceled, in fact, more because Cisco’s to B gene did not match the Flip Video business, and the market environment was not a decisive factor.

The pocket camera inspired the iPod with a camera and nearly became Google's first hardware.

Now you look at some of the features of Flip Video, take it with you, take it out at any time, and simple operations, editing, uploading features, many of which are similar to today’s phone shooting. If the Pure Digital brand can stay, it may be like Casio to launch a selfie camera, will do sports cameras, even smartphones, but the fate of this, there is no chance of a comeback, the concept of pocket cameras has been inherited by future generations.