Why is Windows 10’s Android app only available for Samsung phones?

In the Windows 10 May 2020 (20H1/Version 2004) feature update, Microsoft introduced a new feature called “Hosted Apps Model” (Managed App Model) that allows apps such as PWA to register as stand-alone apps, access background process tasks, notifications, live tiles, and more.

Why is Windows 10's Android app only available for Samsung phones?

According to microsoft’s support documentation, hosted apps and parent host apps share executable files, but they look and behave like separate apps on the system. This concept allows the component in the application to behave like a stand-alone Windows 10 program, but the component will require a host process to perform the task.

Microsoft has now allowed the Your Phone app to be a host app and then run the Android app as a managed app. This allows managed Android applications to have their own live tiles, identities, and deep fusion with Windows 10 systems.

Why is Windows 10's Android app only available for Samsung phones?

Microsoft has invited members of the Windows Insider project on the Release Preview channel to test it, but here’s the problem is that the feature is currently only available for Samsung-branded phones.

Why is Windows 10's Android app only available for Samsung phones?

Typically, your Phone’s screen mirroring feature in a Windows 10 system gives you a wider compatibility with your phone by dropping your Android phone screen on a Windows 10 device via Bluetooth Low Energy.

Why is Windows 10's Android app only available for Samsung phones?

But Microsoft said it would abandon its support for Bluetooth low power consumption and make screen mirroring exclusive to Samsung smartphones. Bluetooth low-energy features are only used on a few Windows machines, mostofly flagship products of Microsoft and its partners. By abandoning support for Bluetooth low energy consumption, Windows 10’s screen mirroring capabilities can now be used on more PCs, but this also means that screen mirroring will require the assistance of the phone manufacturer.

Because Microsoft and Samsung are close partners, the tech giant has partnered with Samsung to develop “Link to Windows” that works through Wi-Fi and integrates deeply into OneUI. Windows 10 connects to Samsung phones via Bluetooth during initial setup, but due to The “special driver” built into OneUI, it uses Wi-Fi-based technology to transfer apps directly to the desktop and the latency between devices is reduced.

That means the feature relies not only on Bluetooth, but also with Wi-Fi and custom drivers to reduce latency and lead to a smoother streaming experience. Microsoft and Samsung work closely together to make apps faster and more reliable.