Images made from radio-wave data reveal the hidden beauty of the Milky Way

The latest images of the Milky Way reveal how the center of the Milky Way will be presented to humans if our eyes can observe low-frequency radio waves,media New Atlas reported. The image shows magnetic field signals passing through the Milky Way, including intense star-forming regions and intense supernova explosion remnants.

Images made from radio-wave data reveal the hidden beauty of the Milky Way

Our Milky Way galaxy is essentially a giant cosmic “windmill” consisting of stars, planets, black holes, and huge clouds of dust and gas. The bulging center of the windmill is very dense and is the host of a giant supermassive black hole called The Man-Horse A. From this focus, the majestic arms extend outwards to the relative emptiness of the Milky Way’s space.

The sun is located on a small spin arm called the Orion Arm ( Orion Spur ) , which is a relatively small part sandwiched between the larger human arm and the inthem arm. The universe is full of radioactive objects, which we think of as light in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Sadly, most of the electromagnetic radiation (light) emitted around the universe exists at wavelengths that are invisible to the human eye. When we look at the night sky, what we see is similar to a painting that strips away certain color shadows – beautiful but incomplete.

Images made from radio-wave data reveal the hidden beauty of the Milky Way

Now, a newly released image gives us the opportunity to appreciate some of the hidden beauty of the Milky Way. Typically, radio waves occupy the low-frequency portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and are invisible to the naked eye. However, it can be observed through a dedicated telescope. The new imagewaswashes were created by Dr. Natasha Hurley-Walker, an astrophysicist at the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR).

The data used to create the image was collected by the Murchison Wide Field Array Radio Telescope (MWA), located in the interior of Western Australia. MWA has been observing the sky as part of the Galaxy and Extragalactic Star MWA Survey (GLEAM), which investigated radio emissions over a wide night sky of 72-231 MHz. The resolution of the observation is about 2 arcs. With the help of the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre in Perth, Australia, Dr Hurley-Walker used GLEAM data to create the image.

Images made from radio-wave data reveal the hidden beauty of the Milky Way

Dr Hurley-Walker said: “It is because of this broad frequency range that it is possible to untangle different overlapping objects when looking at the complexity of the center of the Milky Way. “Basically, different objects have different ‘radio colors’, so we can use them to determine what physical role is being played. “

The red area in the image represents the area where the lowest frequency radio waves are transmitted, while the medium frequency is shown in green and the high frequency is blue. The vision shows the position of the supernova as a bright little sphere, while the region where the vibrant young star is born is shown in blue. The golden filaments accentuate the position of the large and powerful magnetic field.

Images made from radio-wave data reveal the hidden beauty of the Milky Way

Astronomers have found 27 supernova remnants in GLEAM data, including one sseen by indigenous Australians about 9,000 years ago.

After determining the date of the explosion and the unusual location of the star, Dr Hurley-Walker and his colleagues wanted to talk to indigenous elders to find out whether the ancients had recorded the event in any form.

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