There is a gender difference in the immune response of people with new crown infections.

Researchers at Yale University have found differences in how men’s and women’s immune systems respond to the new coronary virus. The study was published last week in the journal Nature. According to Johns Hopkins University, more than 25 million people worldwide have been infected with new crown infections, and more than 850,000 people have died, with men accounting for 60% of all deaths. The researchers collected nasal, saliva, and blood samples from a control group and infected patients who had never been infected, tracking differences in immune responses observed by different patients.

There is a gender difference in the immune response of people with new crown infections.

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When comparing men and women infected, the researchers found significant differences in immune responses between men and women in the early stages of infection. Female patients have a stronger and more sustained T-cell response than male patients. T cells are an important part of the immune system and their role includes killing infected cells. Poor T-cell response in male patients was associated with poor disease outcomes. Compared to the healthy control group, patients had higher levels of innitive immune cytokines and cytokines (these signaling molecules were involved in collecting immune cells to the inflammatory site). However, some of these factors were higher in male patients than in female patients. In female patients, higher levels of congenital immunocytokines were associated with poorer disease response. The results suggest that male patients may benefit from therapy that improves T-cell response, while female patients may benefit from therapy that inhibits early congenital immune responses. Still, the researchers caution that they can’t rule out other potential factors that could alter the risk of adverse prognostication in both male and female patients.