Anticholinel drugs used to treat a variety of common diseases are thought to be associated with cognitive decline.

Anticholinel drugs used to treat a variety of diseases, including allergies, colds, high blood pressure, bladder hyperactive disorder and depression, may be associated with an increased risk of mild thinking and memory problems, especially in people with genetic risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease or markers, according to a new study.

Anticholinel drugs used to treat a variety of common diseases are thought to be associated with cognitive decline.

Recently, the American Academy of Neurology published a new study on this class of drugs. In the study, the researchers explained that taking these drugs has been linked to memory problems and mild thinking problems. About 100 of these drugs are widely used, some require prescriptions, and many others can be purchased at pharmacies.

Over the next decade, people who took at least one anticholinel drug were 47 percent more likely to have mild cognitive impairment than those who did not, the study found. Mild cognitive impairment can be an early warning sign of the eventual development of dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease. The study involved 688 participants, with an average age of 74, who had no memory problems at the start of the study.

Study author Dr Lisa Delano-Wood, of the University of California, San Diego, said: “Our results suggest that reducing the use of anticholinear energy drugs before people have any cognitive problems may be an important way to prevent these drugs from negatively affecting thinking skills, especially for those at higher risk of Developing Alzheimer’s disease. We also need to do research in the future to see if we can actually stop using these drugs to reduce the incidence of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. “