For the first time, the giant tooth shark was accurately modeled: it was more than 18 meters long and weighed more than 48 tons.

In the Earth’s oceans between 4 and 23 million years ago, there were many large marine creatures, including megalodon sharks. Paleontologists have struggled to estimate the actual size of giant tooth sharks due to the lack of complete fossil specimens. But now the British scientific team has come up with what they think is the most accurate measurement of an adult tooth shark, and the size is incredible.

For the first time, the giant tooth shark was accurately modeled: it was more than 18 meters long and weighed more than 48 tons.

According to the paper, published in Scientific Reports, the study is based on measurements of existing fossil remains. This is mainly by reverse modeling the teeth, and by comparing the size of the teeth with modern shark species, the researchers were able to map out the full size of the adult shark.

For the first time, the giant tooth shark was accurately modeled: it was more than 18 meters long and weighed more than 48 tons.

According to the team’s calculations, adult toothed sharks can be longer than 59 feet (about 18 meters) in length and weigh more than 48 tons. It is undoubtedly a true marine behemoth, with single dorsal fins as high as ordinary people.

“This study marks the first quantitative estimate of the size of a particular body part of a giant tooth shark, surpassing its overall body size,” the researchers wrote. Our models based on modern similarity selection are superior to those that use individual species, such as C. carcharias, and explain the variability around body size averages. “