Leyat Helica propeller car: a very bad idea.

According tomedia reports, the Concours of Elegance at Hampton Court Palace in the United Kingdom is an extraordinary event, it will be the upper classes and a variety of fascinating car machinery into one. But in more than a century of automotive history, it’s hard to get people’s attention off it. It was a 1921 Leyat Helica, which Frenchman Marcel Leyat had built, when only 23 were reported to have been sold.

Leyat Helica propeller car: a very bad idea.

Before the outbreak of World War I, Leyat was a biplane designer, but he later turned to car design because he felt there was one or two things the aviation world had to teach car designers.

First, he argues that early car designs were too heavy and aerodynamically inefficient, problems the airline industry has been trying to solve. Second, he felt that the drive wheel was another unnecessary and complex power-consuming job that required transmissions, clutches, drive shafts, differentials and a variety of other parts.

Leyat Helica propeller car: a very bad idea.

Aircraft, on the other hand, have been designed to be aerodynamic and lightweight from the start, and propellers can be mounted more or less directly on the crankshaft of the engine.

When Leyat built his first Helica in 1913, horsepower was a scarce resource, and the car was powered by an 18-horsepower, 1000cc Harley-Davidson v-twin engine. His goal is to get power from power in the most efficient way possible. He did a good job of that, and then Helica recorded a top speed of 106 miles (171 km/h) in 1927, which was a terrible speed at the time.

In other ways, Leyat’s propellers and several other similar designs were a bad idea from the start, because they had huge propellers at the front. This design may allow lost pedestrians and wayic pigeons to end up passing through thousands of rpm blenders, with bloody images at the back predictable.

Leyat Helica propeller car: a very bad idea.

What’s more, in the event of a tailgating accident, the rotating mass of the wooden struts becomes a high-energy aerial shrapnod constellation. When a car does not explode in an accident, it obscures the driver’s view, and a high-speed wind blows directly into his face, increasing the likelihood of an accident. In addition, Leyat uses an aircraft-inspired steering method that avoids complex steering frames and uses a very simple cable-operated rear wheel steering system that turns the rear end of the car to one side.

Leyat Helica propeller car: a very bad idea.

The resulting vehicles seem to make it almost impossible to believe that propellers will be the cars of the future.