The Flying-Y energy-efficient aircraft successfully completed its first test flight at a German military base.

A team of researchers and engineers from Delft University of Technology went to an air base in Germany this summer for the first real test flight of a scaled flight model of an energy-efficient aircraft called Flying-Y,media reported. It is understood that the model machine width of 3 meters, weighing 22.5 kg. With the help of the Airbus team, it conducted a test flight at an air base in Germany. The goal of the test flight is to complete take-off, flight test action and proximity, and land when the battery is almost exhausted.

The Flying-Y energy-efficient aircraft successfully completed its first test flight at a German military base.

The development team was at first concerned about the take-off because calculations showed that the rotation of the plane was a potential problem. To prevent any rotation problems, the team optimized the flight model, but the test flight will demonstrate the aircraft’s design capabilities. The end result is that take-off is easy and spins at 80km/h.

The flight test was found to be a challenge to the team. They had to change the plane’s center of gravity and fix the internal antenna to improve telemetry. During the test flight, the team also learned that the plane was designed with too many “Dutch rolls”, which could lead to some rough landings. The team plans to collect data during the flight and build an aerodynamic software model of the aircraft.

The Flying-Y energy-efficient aircraft successfully completed its first test flight at a German military base.

This data will be used to design flight simulators for future research and to improve flight characteristics. The team’s researchers will also use the data to create a scale model for future flight tests. Flying-Y is a design for highly energy-efficient long-range aircraft. The aircraft is designed to integrate the cabin, cargo hold and fuel tank into the wing and form a unique V-shaped shape.

Computer calculations predict that improved aerodynamic shape and reduced weight will help the aircraft reduce fuel consumption by 20 percent compared to the most advanced aircraft technology technology technology technology.