Study finds students who don’t eat breakfast do worse: 10 points difference

A new study published in The Frontiers of Public Health by researchers at the University of Leeds suggests that students who rarely eat breakfast do worse than those who eat breakfast regularly, according to a new study published in The Frontiers of Public Health. A 2011 survey of 294 students in West Yorkshire, England, by a team from the University of Leeds, found that 29 per cent had little or no breakfast; 18 per cent had breakfast occasionally; and 53 per cent had breakfast regularly.

Study finds students who don't eat breakfast do worse: 10 points difference

The study was based on the results of the UK GCSE (general secondary education certificate, equivalent to the english student’s secondary exam results), of which A is 58, A is 52, B is 46, and so on.

After adjusting for other important factors (socioeconomic status, race, age, gender, and BMI), it was found that the overall score of students who rarely ate breakfast was 10.25 points lower than those who ate breakfast regularly, a difference of nearly two grades.

The researchers also counted individual subjects, with students who rarely ate breakfast scoring 1.20 points lower than students who ate breakfast regularly, a difference of nearly one-fifth.

The study demonstrated that eating breakfast can improve students’ educational levels, improve classroom attention, lateness, and behavior norms.

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