EU rules new will require alcohol tester connections for new cars in the future

In an effort to more effectively stamp out drink-driving, the European Union recently introduced a new rule that will require all new vehicles to be fitted with “breathing alcohol detectors.” The new rules require all new vehicles to have an alcohol tester connection from May 2022. Once the driver has been tested by the in-car alcohol tester for exceeding the alcohol level in his body, the vehicle’s engine will not be activated.

Since the mid-20th century, many European countries have made drink-driving illegal and have begun to use breathing. In 2012, the French government announced that drivers entering France must place alcohol testers in their cars or face fines. Affected by this, disposable simple alcohol breathing testing equipment has become a must-have for many drivers.

EU rules new will require alcohol tester connections for new cars in the future

(Reuters) – It is very common in EU countries to place alcohol testing devices in cars. The new rules have also been seen as an upgrade, and drivers in London are now able to buy electronic alcohol intoxication devices at major car stores. The aim is to be able to measure anytime, anywhere to prevent drunk driving.

Britain has the highest penalties for drink-driving in the EU. Under British law, drivers who drink and drive for the first time can have their licence revoked for one year, while those in serious condition may be permanently suspended, fined for not being online or even jailed. According to statistics, about 12% of all traffic accidents in the UK in 2017 were related to drink-driving.

EU rules new will require alcohol tester connections for new cars in the future

Josh Harris, project director of a driving safety charity in the UK: We want the UK to introduce zero-tolerance rules on drink-driving so people can fully realize that you can’t drive as long as they touch alcohol.

The European Commission on Transportation said new rules on new safety and support systems could reduce traffic accidents by 30 per cent over the next 15 years and save 25,000 lives in Europe.

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