Microsoft releases Windows 10 Build 20226 to detect NVMe SSD hardware anomalies.

Microsoft has just pushed Insider testers for a preview of Windows 10 Build 20226, a compiled version that features hardware anomaly detection for NVMe SSDs to help users protect their data. Microsoft mentioned in the change log that Build 20226 has added storage health monitoring to send notifications to users when NVMe SSD hardware anomalies are detected.

Microsoft releases Windows 10 Build 20226 to detect NVMe SSD hardware anomalies.

(From: Windows Blog)

Clearly, Microsoft wants users to have enough time to act before a serious drive failure, so as to avoid frustrating remedies, such as expensive data recovery.

Microsoft releases Windows 10 Build 20226 to detect NVMe SSD hardware anomalies.

By clicking on the drive exception notification, the user will be directed to the drive property page in Windows 10 Storage Settings (Settings – – System – Storage – Storage – Management Disks and Volumes – – Property) for more details.

Microsoft releases Windows 10 Build 20226 to detect NVMe SSD hardware anomalies.

In addition, Windows 10 Build 20226 brings other improvements, such as the new phone setup experience, which enables seamless device management within your Phone app.

Microsoft releases Windows 10 Build 20226 to detect NVMe SSD hardware anomalies.

The development team says users can easily connect new devices, remove old devices, and switch between active devices within the new app, and Your Phone brings visual sensory improvements to the device list.

The new experience will gradually push Insider testers, so it may take some time to feel the change, and Microsoft wants you to be able to actively submit feedback (set up – help and feedback – send feedback).

Microsoft releases Windows 10 Build 20226 to detect NVMe SSD hardware anomalies.

It’s worth noting that Windows 10 Build 20226 also brings SDK improvements, and the Dev channel will have an ongoing flight preview, with flight Hub available for more information.

For more improvements, fixes, and known issues, also move to Windows Blog.