Showing the amazing picture of a natural disaster: NASA shares space photos of wildfires in the western United States.

According tomedia reports, NASA often publishes photos showing its photographic abilities in a series called Image of the Day. The latest in a series of satellite images from the western United States shows a large amount of smoke from wildfires burning. This photograph shows the amazing scene of this natural disaster, which would not have been possible without modern technology.

Several ongoing wildfires are known to have occurred in western North America, most of them in California. Last month, the volcanoes were so large that they produced so much smoke that they swept across the United States and quickly crossed the ocean to Europe. Although we have many images of fires on the ground, they also provide an important viewing angle, but it is difficult to tell the extent of the fire’s impact without looking away.

And that’s where satellites come in. NASA has several Earth-focused satellites that are used to predict possible future weather events and to assess the impact of current and past events. The latest wildfire photos highlight this point. According to nasa, the image was taken by the Aqua satellite on September 29, local time.

Showing the amazing picture of a natural disaster: NASA shares space photos of wildfires in the western United States.

If you look closely, you can see that this satellite image is very special. It is understood that the left half of the photo is visible light, the right half is an infrared image showing the heat of the flame. This provides two unique perspectives on the same event, while attracting attention to the large amount of smoke generated by these fires. There are still serious wildfires in California and the Pacific Northwest, according to NASA.

Of these active wildfires, the largest is California’s Autost Complex, which has broken the state’s record for the largest wildfire in the state’s history. The fire is out of control on nearly a million acres. As a result of recent changes in wind direction, smog that initially spread eastwards is now reversing and blowing westwards over the Pacific Ocean.