NASA shares time-lapse photography video to review the brightness changes of SN 2018gv supernovae.

Nasa and the European Space Agency have discovered a white dwarf star on the edge of NGC 2525, a spiral galaxy 70 million light-years away, and have been observing the end of its life. Observations by the Hubble telescope show that the supernova burst was 5 billion times brighter than the sun’s, but its light eventually disappeared a year later.

NASA shares time-lapse photography video to review the brightness changes of SN 2018gv supernovae.

NGC 2525 Illustration (from NASA / ESA / Hubble)

NASA and ESA are reported to have been observing the supernova, called SN 2018gv, for nearly a year in February 2018.

NASA said in a statement Thursday that when a star emits billions of times the sun’s light in a few days, you know it’s time.

NASA shares time-lapse photography video to review the brightness changes of SN 2018gv supernovae.

Screenshot of the video.

But Hubble’s observations of supernovae could also help scientists better understand the rate at which the universe expands. NASA added:

“Supernova eruptions are not only a brilliant cosmic firework, but also a milestone in measuring the distance of galaxies. We can use this to calculate the speed of the intergalactic speed, and instead to predict the age of the universe.”

Time-Lapse of Supernova in NGC 2525 (via)

Finally, NASA shared a time-lapse photography video documenting changes in the brightness of SN 2018gv supernovae, making us strongly aware that even stars in the sky don’t always shine in space.