Sourcegraph: Developers now manage 100 times more code than they managed in 2010.

Sourcegraph, which specializes in generic code search, surveyed more than 500 North American software developers to determine code complexity and management issues,media reported. It is important to understand the perspective of the survey before delving into the data. Sourcegraph’s own business model supports enterprise-wide code search — which means it can search not only through directories, but also in a large number of repositories (on-premises and in the cloud) and in almost any language users can think of.

This universal parallel search becomes increasingly important as project size and technology diversity grow.

Sourcegraph refers to the critical mass of this technical complexity as large code, while developer surveys try to grasp the scale and scope of this growth.

More code than ever before.

Sourcegraph: Developers now manage 100 times more code than they managed in 2010.

About half of the developers surveyed said they managed 100 times more code than in 2010.

When Resourcegraph CEO Quinn Slack spoke to the media, he used the chart above as an opening statement. It’s not surprising that the amount of code managed by a typical organization or developer has grown over the past decade — but many people outside the industry may not realize how much. More than half of the developers surveyed reported growth (in megabytes) of more than a hundred times.

The growth of this code can be demonstrated by increasingly complex code, but much of it comes from the increased diversity of platforms and tools used. Modern development, especially Web development, often means the consolidation of many different platforms, libraries, and dependencies. The number of support architectures, devices, languages, repositories, and so on reported by the developers surveyed increased.

Most companies are now technology companies.

Sourcegraph: Developers now manage 100 times more code than they managed in 2010.

In 2020, it’s hard not to be a technology company.

Another interesting chart is for developers who are not traditionally considered technology companies, such as insurance, retail, and even food and beverage companies. Of the developers surveyed, 91 percent said their non-tech companies were more like technology companies than they were a decade ago.