A recent Windows 10 update confirmed that a bug that damaged the network connection had been fixed.

Microsoft has finally launched a bug fix that could ruin your Wi-Fi or Ethernet-based Internet connection. Earlier this year, users began reporting an error that compromised the quality of their Wi-Fi connection and caused the Internet icon to disappear from the taskbar. In some cases, Wi-Fi icons have also been observed reporting “no Internet connection” errors, although there are no problems with the connection.

A recent Windows 10 update confirmed that a bug that damaged the network connection had been fixed.

A recent Windows 10 update confirmed that a bug that damaged the network connection had been fixed.

At first users believed that the problem was caused by the Windows 10 May 2020 update, but the problem was later observed in Windows 10 version 1909 and later in older versions of the patch. When you encounter an error in the taskbar that does not have an Internet connection, some applications will stop working directly or go offline, such as Spotify and Microsoft Stores, and use the Windows API, which relies on NCSI, to check the network connection. The analysis then found that the error was related to the Network Connection Status Indicator (NCSI) located in the taskbar.

However, users who encounter this NCSI error can still run Microsoft Edge, Firefox, and other desktop apps. The bug appears to be aimed only at Microsoft Store apps, but some non-store apps that rely on NCSI for network connectivity will also stop working.

Fortunately, Windows 10 finally received a bug fix for the network system bug that has plagued users for more than three months. To fix this issue, you only need to download and install Windows 10 Build 19041.546, which is currently available for download under the Optional Updates interface.

A recent Windows 10 update confirmed that a bug that damaged the network connection had been fixed.

When the patch is applied, Windows 10 automatically sets the “EnableActiveProbing” value in the registry to 1, which solves some of the user’s problems.

For other users who say the value has been set to 1, Microsoft has also fixed problems with the Windows API, which can solve the dilemma of those users who are more persistent.