Studies have shown that there may be a large number of free-floating wandering planets in the Milky Way.

The film “Wandering Earth” is no stranger to everyone, and in the universe, astronomers have really discovered the real version of “Wandering Earth”, or rather “Wandering Planet”. In general, planets rotate around their host stars, but for a variety of reasons, some planets are forced to leave the gravitational range of their host stars and wander through vast interstellar spaces.

Studies have shown that there may be a large number of free-floating wandering planets in the Milky Way.

Of course, finding an object that doesn’t glow in itself in near-infinite space can be challenging, but using micro-lens technology, astronomers have found the wandering planet, named OGLE-2016-BLG-1928.

It was discovered in a micro-lensing incident that lasted only 41.5 minutes.

Astronomers believe that in the early stages of star system formation, some low-mass planets were ejected from the star’s gravitational range, and according to planet-forming theories such as the theory of core growth, the ejected planets should have a mass between 0.3 and 1.0 times the mass of Earth, not too large.

Theoretical studies suggest that there may be billions or even trillions of free-floating planets in the Milky Way.