Microsoft explains why a single web page calls multiple Windows processes in the Edge browser.

If you’ve ever viewed Windows 10’s Task Manager with just one web page open, you might be surprised to find that there are multiple browser processes in it. To answer this question, Microsoft gave a detailed explanation in a recent blog post. It points out that modern browsers are built on a multi-process system, meaning applications can be divided into different processes.

Microsoft explains why a single web page calls multiple Windows processes in the Edge browser.

(From: Microsoft Edge Blog)

In the case of Chromium Edge, the browser is divided into different parts such as the main process, renderer, GPU operations, utility features, plug-in extensions, crash pad handles, and so on.

The main process is primarily responsible for the management of windows and tabs, controls the browser’s address bar, forward/back buttons, and has privileges for processes such as access to useful features, such as network requests and file access.

The renderer process controls the rendering of a Web page in tabs by executing the code provided by the Web site, and can handle content such as hyper-text markup language (HTML), cascading style sheets (CSS), JavaScript, and images.

The GPU computing process is responsible for all tasks related to graphics hardware, such as accelerating graphics calculations and outputing processor results to the display.

The utility process is responsible for audio-visual playback, network services, data decoding, and collection management, which Microsoft Edge can use to control, manage, and coordinate calls to global system resources.

Microsoft explains why a single web page calls multiple Windows processes in the Edge browser.

Plug-ins and extension processes are responsible for managing individual active plug-ins, such as Adobe Flash, resource usage for each process, and communication with the main process/renderer, depending on the specific code.

Crash handle handlers track the health of different processes in Microsoft Edge, and in the event of a crash, Crashpad Handler is able to catch exceptions and pass error reports to Microsoft servers to find problems and fix them.

In addition, in terms of reliability and security, even different elements on the same page may be assigned separate processes.

This prevents malware from affecting another process even if it inadvertently exploits a security vulnerability in one renderer process.

Microsoft explains why a single web page calls multiple Windows processes in the Edge browser.

Microsoft explained that malicious attackers have long been responsible for interacting with the site because of the renderer process. To improve security, modern browsers assign it lower privileges and have greatly limited access to the operating system.

Another benefit of isolating processes from each other is the ability to prevent “visits” to another process, which improves the overall security of the browser, such as preventing ads from websites from obtaining sensitive information.

It’s also worth noting that if a web application, extension, or plug-in partially crashes, only a small number of impacts (most tabs still work), the overall reliability of the browser is greatly improved.

Finally, this feature gives users a more intuitive view of the resource footprint of each process, and then analyzes which site, extension, or plug-in consumes too much resources.

Interested friends can call out the browser’s task manager in Microsoft Edge by using the Shift-Esc key combination (or by clicking “Settings – – more – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –